Compensation Best Practices in 2020

It would be so simple if practice owners could open a fortune cookie for each one of their employees and find the method by which to fairly compensate them.  While there are commonly accepted methods of compensation, their implementation in veterinary practices varies because different entrepreneurs have different business goals.  Also, “fairness” is a relative term that introduces variability into an equation that might otherwise be consistent from practice to practice.  This article describes the factors that practice owners should consider when determining compensation for veterinarians and paraprofessional staff.

Benchmarks

Below is a table that provides a snapshot of current key indicators available for small animal companion practices.  It is not meant to be all-inclusive, but rather to provide some guidelines that enable managers to take the practice’s compensation pulse. They can then determine if the practice is on track for the next year or needs to perform some diagnostics to prevent a fiscal derailment.

Veterinary Compensation

            Many periodicals and books discuss the factors one should consider in establishing a compensation policy for veterinarians. Of particular importance is the question of whether compensation should consist of a fixed salary, a percentage of the revenue generated by the veterinarian and collected by the practice (i.e., commission-based), or a combination of the two. If a commission-based component is present, it is also important to consider how the revenue figure will be calculated. Will it be limited to revenues generated from professional services, or will it include revenues generated from items like over-the-counter medications and foods?    Percentages can also vary in relation to the magnitude of the revenue number that is generated.  Implementing compensation systems in practice requires attention to the details of production calculation and timing of payment. The key to remember is there is NO one size fits all when determining the appropriate compensation for veterinary and non-veterinary staff.  There are numerous factors that go into assessing the actual method used for compensation, which often requires the assistance of an advisor. 

National starting salary information is generally published annually in the Journal of the AVMA. (See: Employment, starting salaries, and educational indebtedness of year-2013 graduates of US veterinary medical colleges, October 1, 2013, Vol. 243, No. 7, Pages 983-987; Employment of male and female graduates of US veterinary medical colleges,  JAVMA October 1, 2011, Vol. 239, No. 7, Pages 953-957.) See also the latest biennial edition of the American Animal Hospital Association’s Compensation and Benefits-An In-Depth Look and the AVMA’s Economic Report on Veterinarians and Veterinary Practices (Wise, J., Center for Information Management, AVMA, Shaumberg, IL (Tel: 847-925-8070). Two periodicals, Veterinary Economics and Veterinary Hospital Management Association Newsletter, also regularly publish helpful articles. In addition, Wutchiett Tumblin and Veterinary Economics published Benchmarks 2019 Well Managed Practices.

Paraprofessional Compensation

Paraprofessionals are often compensated on an hourly basis and the industry has yet to develop widely adopted performance-based compensation models. Paraprofessionals generally report low job satisfaction and high turnover rates. In the 2016 NAVTA Demographic Survey, 38% of veterinary technicians left the practice due to insufficient pay, 20% due to lack of respect from an employer, 20% from burnout and 14% because of the lack of benefits. Full time technicians reported a salary between $15-20 per hour, while part-time technicians reported $14-16 per hour. After taxes, even the well-paid veterinary technicians are only slightly above what is considered the poverty line for a family of four in the United States ($24,300).

According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median pay for veterinary technicians was $16.55 per hour in 2018. By comparison, a JAVMA published study on Jan. 1, 2016 of certified veterinary technician specialists reported that the weighted mean pay rate in 2013 was $23.50 per hour.

In AAHA’s 2020 Compensation & Benefits survey, average veterinary employee turnover was 23%.  Turnover was 32.5% for receptionists, 23.4% for veterinary technicians, 10.3% for managers, 16% for associate veterinarians, and 32.9% for all other staff. To compare with the national workforce, Compdata’s Annual Compensation Survey showed that national average turnover was 15.9% in 2010 and 19.3% in 2018.  The chart above can be helpful to calculate a practice’s turnover expenses. Turnover is a pervasive and expensive problem that can be mitigated by learning how to properly motivate employees. 

Lawful Terminations: A How-to Guide

When deciding whether or not to terminate an employee, and weighing the pros and cons, you need to assess the costs and benefits of keeping this employee versus firing him or her. Consider the following:

  • the nature of the behavior or performance issues involved
  • the seriousness of these issues
  • how this employee is affecting other employees or clients
  • how easily you can replace this employee
  • the costs of recruiting, hiring, training and retaining a new employee

If this employee is exposing your practice to significant legal or business risks, then the decision to terminate the employee will be different from one where, perhaps with coaching, the employee could potentially contribute to the company.

If the issues are increasing the workload and responsibility of other employees, then it is important to also consider the ripple effects that the behavior of one employee is having on the entire practice.

This article will review the key considerations when beginning the process of a lawful termination. Start with the question of why you are considering terminating this employee. It is important that you can determine the reason before moving forward with the rest of the process.

It may be tempting to terminate someone’s employment because he or she doesn’t fit well into the company culture, or isn’t especially likeable.  It’s easy to revert to the notion of at-will employment when that’s the case. The principle of at-will employment means that an employee can be fired at any time, for any reason, as long as there is not an illegal reason involved. Some people may conclude that there shouldn’t be a problem with this termination.

An issue can develop if you terminate an employee at will, and then that employee states that an illegal reason was involved. In this case, the employer must prove that this was not the situation.  Unfortunately, wrongful termination claims are not always easy to disprove. They can also harm your practice’s reputation, breed mistrust among other employees, and lead to lawsuits.

Next, we will review the following:

  • reasons for wrongful termination claims
  • the actual conversation about termination
  • information about high-risk terminations

Throughout this article, we will also share strategies to protect your practice.

Reasons for Wrongful Termination Claims

One reason for wrongful termination is employment discrimination. It can include discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin. An employer also cannot discriminate against an employee because of their disability, age or pregnancy. These are all illegal reasons to fire someone. You also can’t terminate an employee as a form of retaliation. 

An employer has the legal obligation to honor employment contracts, union or non-union, including termination clauses. Not doing so is considered breach of contract. There can also be an implied breach of contract, when a company implies, either in writing or verbally, that employment is protected.

This is not intended to be a complete list of potential wrongful termination claims. Instead, it can be used to show the flaws in simply firing someone, at will. There is a more graceful way to go through the process, and  when followed, it should prevent the employee from being surprised that he or she is getting fired. Therefore, the employer is better protected against claims of wrongful termination.

Poor Performance/Behavior Over Time

It’s important to create and carefully follow a disciplinary policy for your practice. It may consist of rules such as providing an employee who has demonstrated a substandard performance with a verbal warning the first time, a written warning the second, and probation or termination on the third. In order to have an effective disciplinary policy, though, you’ll also need to have clear and consistent policies about employee behavior and performance so that your employees clearly know the practice’s expectations. The policies must be consistently enforced, as well.

When a policy is broken, you should follow your progressive disciplinary procedures in a timely way, and in a way in which the severity of consequences increases if an employee doesn’t correct the behavior. In your disciplinary meetings with that employee, you can then share what policies were broken, why this is problematic, and the consequences.

Document every time that you speak to a particular employee about the issue (such as lateness or gossiping), doing so directly after the meeting and listing the following:

  • date of the meeting
  • specific behaviors discussed
  • policy broken
  • consequence for this behavior
  • consequences if this happens again
  • employee’s responses
  • date of follow-up meeting with the employee

It is recommended that you have another manager at disciplinary meetings. This allows one person from the practice to conduct the conversation with the employee, and the other to take notes and serve as a witness. Be sure to have the employee sign relevant disciplinary documents. Following this procedure gives your employee a chance to improve, while also protecting you, as an employer, from wrongful termination claims or lawsuits.

Keep in mind that each time a disciplinary procedure occurs with an employee, the documents that you create may ultimately end up in court. Be sure to professionally list all pertinent details. Avoid judging or interpreting an employee’s behavior; for example, do not comment that while George says he’s late because of traffic, the real issue is that he’s lazy. Stick to the facts.

If your employee isn’t breaking policies, but also isn’t meeting expectations, you can create a performance improvement plan (PIP). This allows you to share goals and checkpoints, while also offering concrete next steps and support. Be sure to have the employee sign the PIP. Keep this documentation, whether disciplinary or PIP, confidential and safely stored.

One-Time Incident

Although documenting behavior or performance issues over time is best, sometimes it isn’t possible. For example, if an employee steals money, becomes violent at work, or brings illegal drugs to the workplace, then the rule that is broken is so severe that the employee needs to be fired immediately. In that case, what’s important is that you respond to any future situations of this severity at a comparable level of discipline.

Conversation about Termination

If the decision to fire a particular employee has been made, then the next issue to consider is how to have the conversation with him or her. If you’ve provided that employee with verbal and written warnings according to your company’s disciplinary policy, then you have increased your protection. Another option is to consult with your practice attorney to make sure that the termination is solid. This will prepare you in case the employee decides to pursue action against the practice.

Once you’re ready to hold the meeting, be timely about making it happen. However, take into account if that employee has something significant happening that day that could make your timing inappropriate.

It can help to have a termination agenda to keep the meeting on track and provide topics to be covered. The agenda should also include items to be returned to the employee and a reminder to get a confirmation of the person’s current address so a final paycheck can be mailed. Having an agenda can also help to guide all parties involved through what’s likely to be an emotionally-charged and stressful meeting, and help to ensure that you cover all necessary items.

Be sure that the location of the meeting is somewhere private. Then, be direct and clear without being harsh. Explain to the employee that after meeting with that employee to discuss behaviors, including the issuance of verbal and written warnings, the decision was made to separate employment that day. Be transparent and make sure you state that the decision is not negotiable. If the employee tries to debate the decision, don’t engage or try to justify yourself, and avoid saying anything that could be construed as a threat.

Keep the meeting short, lasting no longer than 10 to 15 minutes. The greater the length of the meeting, the more potential that something could be said that could expose the practice to a lawsuit. Close the meeting by thanking the employee for contributions made and extend to him or her your best wishes for the future.

An important topic to discuss is the specifics about the physical separation from the workplace. Should the employee, for example, take his or her belongings now? Or do you plan to meet him or her after hours to take out belongings when other employees aren’t at work? In some cases, the employee may have missed too much work, which led to the termination; in that case, you may want to focus on avoiding a humiliating situation for the person. If the reason for termination is something such as embezzlement, then your main focus would be to have the employee leave the workplace as soon as possible. If the ex-employee has property of someone else’s at work, or vice versa, arrangements must be made to transfer belongings.

Be prepared to answer questions that might arise. You can’t predict what they will be, but a common question is whether you will provide references for that person. Regardless of your response, make sure to protect your company while also treating the terminated employee with respect.

Prepare to provide any relevant information about the employee such as benefits, unused vacation time, or any severance agreement. Summarize all relevant information in a termination letter. This dated letter should state that the employee has been terminated, along with a brief description of why and any other pertinent details.

Afterwards, let other employees know about the termination without discussing any confidential information or making negative comments about the former employee. Be straightforward, sharing information the other employees need to know, reassuring them that the company isn’t eliminating roles. Acknowledge that, in the short term, other employees may need to help to manage that person’s workload.

High-Risk Terminations

These are terminations where employees are likely to sue the employer in connection with the termination. Some situations in which this is more likely to happen include the following:

  • employee is a member of a legally protected class
  • employee is a difficult one
  • employee has a relative who is an attorney
  • employee is surprised by the termination

As far as the first example, federal law prohibits discrimination on the basis of age (over 40), race, color, religion, sex, national origin or disability. In addition, individual states may have laws that are more stringent. When terminating the employment of someone in a protected class, the employer may be vulnerable to anti-discrimination claims for any statements made prior to, during or even after the employee’s tenure. Examples of these statements are as follows:

  • I know it must be hard to balance your job responsibilities with the new baby.
  • Most 50-year-olds would have trouble meeting the physical demands of this job.

Comments such as those are commonly part of a casual conversation with no discriminatory intent, but could add credence to a wrongful termination claim.

Other employees are difficult: argumentative and/or obstinate. They may refuse to take responsibility for their behavior or performance, becoming defensive and blaming others. Employers may be reluctant to fire this type of employee, fearing confrontation or retaliation. The practice can effectively be held hostage to this type of employee and, when fired, the employee may respond with a lawsuit.

When employees have relatives who are attorneys, it may make it easier for them to sue. The relative may even make the suggestion, and if legal services are offered to the disgruntled employee at a reduced fee, or even for free, there are fewer barriers to suing. Finally, surprised employees may be so devastated that they legally challenge the termination. These situations highlight the importance of carefully creating and following policies as described.

Conclusion

The termination process is almost always uncomfortable, carrying with it a varying degree of legal risk for your practice. Your goal is to make the process as amicable as possible while continuing to minimize risk along the way. The recommendations in this article won’t cover every situation but should provide broad guidelines that you can tailor to your unique circumstances. It is recommended to consult with an employment attorney experienced in the laws for your state.

Read more on the WMPB website here!

Is Bad Communication Stunting Your Practice’s Growth?

Originally Published in Today’s Veterinary Business December 2019

Is Bad Communication Stunting Your Practice’s Growth?

When you look back at your former teachers, you realize that some people make learning more engaging and can communicate concepts more efficiently than others. They all might have the same degree of knowledge, but not everyone has the communication skills needed to effectively share that knowledge. In the same vein, in a workplace setting, someone can be incredibly knowledgeable and have transformative ideas, but the information must be effectively communicated. Unfortunately, that’s not always the case. Many practices lack proper communication within their team, thus affecting how the practice runs during a normal day.

Imagine the following situation:
Technician A, “Wendy,” and Technician B, “Bill,” have set schedules during the week. Wendy comes from 8 am to 3 pm and Bill comes in from 1 pm until 8 pm. On Tuesday, Wendy writes on the posted schedule that she will be switching hours with Bill for that Friday, as she has a doctor’s appointment that morning. She does not communicate this to anyone, including Bill.

What Poor Communication Does

Poor communication results in a disconnect between parties and it is especially important for an employer to communicate clearly to its employees. When mixed messages are given at a veterinary practice, employees feel more stressed, which can affect how they react to one another and how they treat clients. Life is more unpredictable when misunderstandings occur, especially in ongoing situations. Employees can carry frustrations home with them. If this is happening at your practice, it’s not a good sign for your clinic’s growth and overall success.

When Friday rolls around, the first client has checked in, but there is no technician to prep the room or initiate the exam. The office manager is trying to call Wendy to see what is going on, but she is not answering because she has a doctor’s appointment…and the day starts off in chaos. The doctor isn’t happy, the client isn’t happy, and the receptionist is on the receiving end of the client’s anger.

When someone communicates poorly at work, goals aren’t accomplished effectively or in a timely way. At the end of the day, the clients are the ones who suffer. Additionally, employees may be forced to pick up the slack, leading to rushed jobs and mistakes. In a business dedicated to the care and well-being of pets, there are some serious consequences that can occur.

In this type of environment, employees may feel insecure about their jobs and feel they never have a moment to breathe, which may lead them to seek another job. A lack of communication or poor communication can increase turnover at a practice, which brings with it all the costs associated with recruiting and training new employees. This slows office productivity, which affects the remaining employees and, most importantly, the clients.

Wendy’s co-workers find themselves in the middle of this situation which they did not create. This causes tension. Many are mad at Wendy for not showing up and creating extra work for them, forcing them to work twice as hard to get everything done. Some are also angry with management as they feel a few employees are treated differently than others and are “allowed to get away with it.” A simple lack of communication has left the practice divided. This, in turn, directly affects how the client sees your practice. Staff with bad attitudes? Staff running around at 100 mph? This doesn’t ease a client’s mind when putting their pets into your staff’s hands.

If you find an increasing number of dissatisfied clients, the reason could be poor communication among people in your practice. The reality is that when the level of communication is substandard, simply maintaining the status quo can be challenging and achieving growth is difficult.

Providing Quality Communication

When you think about communication skills, consider everyone who plays a role at the practice — veterinarians, managers, technicians, receptionists and office staff.

It may be easy to pass the blame on Wendy, who should have at least spoken with Bill about switching shifts for the day. However, can this blame also be placed on the practice for not having a pre-determined system of communication for such events? Should the disgruntled employees bring their concerns to management?

Staff Meetings

Having staff meetings to determine how to stop the cycle of bad communication is imperative. One employee may not see the issues of a practice the same way as another. Similarly, employees may not communicate the same way as each other. However, holding an open discussion to decide on an effective way to communicate with each other is only the first step.

Create an open-floor format

During team meetings, make the environment as welcoming as possible. Start off with an open-ended question like, “How can we communicate more effectively” or “what can we do differently?” Give examples of how you, as a practice manager, can communicate better. This will “break the ice” and show vulnerability, which will help employees feel like it’s a safe place they can share their concerns freely. Try to prevent employees from blaming one another, as listening shuts off as soon as tension rises.

Listen, listen, and listen some more

A big part of effective communication comes down to actively listening to what the other person has to say rather than spending time formulating what you’re going to say next — or, even worse, interrupting the speaker. In today’s world, when people are rewarded for taking action, spending time listening might feel like a somewhat passive activity, but it’s necessary for quality communication.

Implementation

After each meeting, determine what you’ve learned about your practice’s communication strengths and weaknesses, and figure out the opportunities that exist. Then, create a plan for more effective communication. What can be fixed relatively easily? What improvements will create the most positive momentum? What can have financial benefits? Make the changes steadily, and review the progress regularly.

Let’s say our theoretical practice decides to implement a procedure that all requests of shift switches must be approved by the practice manager. Is this to be done through text, email, one-on-one? Or is there a specific request form that needs to be submitted and signed by all three parties (both technicians and manager)?

The next step is holding all employees to the same standard. There should be no “exceptions” to the rule so other employees do not feel like they are being slighted and “so-and-so” is being favorited and doesn’t have to follow protocol. A doctor should have to fill out this request, as does a technician and receptionist. This will eliminate any tension within the practice due to schedule changes, and thus will keep your practice running smoothly.

Good communication is a necessity in running a successful practice. Although it’s hard to look inward at the problems occurring in the practice, identifying key issues is the first step. Then, decide as a team what can be done to modify these issues, and follow it through. Changes may take a while to be implemented, and that’s ok—“A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.”

Welcome, Generation Z

Originally Published in Today’s Veterinary Business October 2019

Millennials are often in the news—and they have been for quite some time now–with countless articles discussing their impact in the workforce. But what about Generation Z? This is the group of people born between about 1995 and 2010. They’re also in or entering the workforce, and their perception of the world and their participation in the workplace is definitely different from that of the Millennials who came before them.

Gen Z, as they’re called, is about 57 million strong in the United States. Other names include Post-Millennials, Founders, Plurals, the iGeneration, and the Homeland Generation. This article will describe, overall, what they value and how they perceive life, with the understanding that not everyone in this generation (or any other generation, for that matter) ever thinks exactly alike.

Core Values & Behaviors

An in-depth survey of this generation conducted by McKinsey & Company determined that Gen Z has several core behaviors in common, each of which center on their search for truth. They avoid labeling; opting to focus more on individuality, honesty and competence of people. Thus, making them more willing to understand different types of people; enabling them to differences of opinion and interact with organizations that don’t match their personal values. They want to spend their energy on causes that matter, such as homelessness, poverty, world hunger, identity, human rights, and gender equality. They want brands to behave in ethical ways, being transparent, and having actions match what company officials say.

As such, it makes sense that diversity is considered the norm by this generation, to the degree that Gen Z often don’t readily think about the demographics of a group, whether that means racially, or religious preferences or sexual orientation. To put this into perspective, Business Insider and Axios predicts that by 2045, the United States will be majority minority; meaning, this may be the last generation where the majority of people in the United States identify as white and, for much of Gen Zs’ lives, the president identified as a black man.

Additionally, Gen Z expresses a desire to be financial stable; this, combined with their aforementioned appreciation for diversity and the changing demographics in the United States, likely attributes to their overall mix of beliefs and can include fiscally conservative points of view combined with socially liberal ones.

Overall, Gen Z can be considered pragmatic, practical, and analytical; believing that most conflicts, including global issues, can be solved through effective uses of communication. Through simple conversations, they are able to learn, strategically gather information, and make highly informed decisions about what their next step(s) should be.

Workplace Values

About 36 percent of Gen Z will be in the workforce by the year 2020. According to statistics quoted by HR Magazine in November/December 2018, 58 percent of them hope to own a business someday (and 14 percent of them already do).

When looking for employment, here’s what matters to Gen Z:

  • Good salary: 35%
  • Enjoyable work environment: 26%
  • Flexible schedule: 14%
  • Opportunity to create new products: 11%
  • Chance to learn new skills: 8%
  • Community focus: 7%

Most have been exposed to the internet and social media their entire lives, making Gen Z very comfortable with the virtual world and with seamlessly crossing from online to “offline” experiences. This ease will certainly have an impact on how technology will continue to evolve in the workplace.

More specifically, Gen Z have always lived in a world where information comes at them, fast and furious: they’ve learned to rapidly process information but may not have long attention spans. They multi-task, shifting from one activity to another, often in a way that people from previous generations may find distracting.

Transforming the Workplace

Millennials have done an excellent job of shedding light on the high costs of higher education plus the student loan debt incurred from the pursuit thereof. From this observation, many from Gen Z may choose to not pursue traditional educational pathways. People of Gen Z may, instead, opt to go straight into the workforce, attend classes online, pursue entrepreneurship, or choose paths that vastly differ from the paths ventured by previous generations.

Assuredly, Gen Z will have a significant impact on the development of workforce, as companies need to manage complex, multi-generational teams consisting of younger Baby Boomers, Gen Xs, Millennials, and Gen Zs. Each generation has different values, workplace expectations, life goals, and more. For example, people of Gen Z have a strong desire for work-life balance and appreciate developing personal, and maintaining, technological connections. In fact, AdWeek recently reported that Gen Z are 1.3 times more likely to buy products if their favorite celebrity advertises it on social media. This is important for companies, as company branding and marketing primarily occur on social media and, as such, if your company has no social media footprint, then your chances of reaching Gen Z diminishes; this represents a significant shift from strategies enacted by past generations’.

In light of this, companies must find strategic ways to take advantage of the human resources they currently have. For instance, employ a strategy that combines mentoring and reverse mentoring; where those who are from Gen Z can educate those from other, older generations and vice versa. Thereby preventing, and potentially wholly avoiding, generational gaps and conflicts that damage productivity, efficiency, and workers’ value.

Alternatively, you can cater to Gen Z’s interest in forming a personal connection. When they work for a company, Gen Z has been shown to prefer regular, in-person feedback from their supervisors; this feedback can be short and sweet, as long as it’s prompt and regular. They also want to interact directly with managers often, even multiple times daily. This shouldn’t be surprising, given that they are used to texting, conversing on social media, and so forth, which can be considered real-time conversations.

When Recruiting

When your practice is recruiting new employees, it can help to think of it as a brand, and then demonstrate your brand visually to attract Gen Z job candidates. Think about what makes your practice unique, what makes it interesting. How can the candidate you’re interviewing contribute to your practice? Make that clear.

People of Gen Z typically read online reviews about companies before they interview with them, and they are attracted to reviews that show how the workplace can be a fun place to be, even when working hard at the job. Flexible schedules and paid time off are attractive to many Gen Zs.

Young adults from this generation often make great employees; especially because Gen Z has the ability to adapt to change in the way that would make most people from older generations uncomfortable. You can consider them to be “radically inclusive”; wherein they value individual expression and don’t readily distinguish their online and offline experiences in the way that other generations do. They don’t differentiate between their friends in the physical world and those they’ve only known online. This is likely true, at least in part, because of the rapidly changing technology that’s always been part of their lives which likely contributes to their ability to quickly learn, their comfort levels with technology, and how much they can contribute to a company’s bottom line.

Although they bring strengths to the workplace, they may need guidance and training on soft skills that previous generations possessed so readily possessed. These are skills like how to handle clients calling your practice and how to respond to them via email, to name a couple. You’ll have to think of other ways to truly address these areas that caters to their inherent abilities like instructional videos, role-plays with co-workers, or even one-on-one training could be appreciated by this tech-savvy generation.

Low-cost Fixes to Prevent OSHA Violations

Does the phrase OSHA violations cause you to shudder in fright? OSHA, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, should not be a scary monster – it exists to ensure you and your employees stay safe in the workplace. Slay the monster with some of these low-cost fixes to common violations.

Maintain easily accessible safety data sheets on all chemicals.
Did you know that your distribution representative has electronic copies of all safety data sheets for products they sell? Take five minutes to ask them to email those over, then put the sheet in a folder on every computer’s desktop.

Required Posters

All required posters can be obtained for free from OSHA! Make sure you check what other posters are required in your state and see if those posters are also provided free of charge. You can find the OSHA posters at this link: https://www.osha.gov/Publications/poster.html

Drink Station

At your next employee meeting, ask the staff to decide on a safe location for drinks. It should be convenient but as far away from animal and laboratory areas as possible. Then, purchase some stylish washi paper tape or fun paint and have a teambuilding activity to define the new space.

Secondary Labels

Containers of chemicals that you or your staff refills from the manufacturer’s container must be labelled. Once you have your safety data sheets, it will only take a few minutes to make a label. Consider using waterproof printable labels, a laminated piece of paper, or purchased pre-printed labels specific to your chemicals. It can seem daunting to find and label every bottle of alcohol or jar of scrub, but why not try turning it into a game of scavenger hunt bingo with the staff? Many hands make light work.

Some OSHA fixes are easier, cheaper, and faster than others. If you need to establish or rejuvenate your training and reporting programs, we are here to help. Just get in touch with our human resources gurus to find the right solution for you!

Why You Should Stop Hiring for Culture Fit

It doesn’t take long to find articles that share why you should hire for culture fit. You might be employed by or have worked for companies that stressed how crucial this is. In fact, it’s gotten to where “hire for culture fit” is something that “everybody knows,” which can serve as a red flag.

First, what does “hire for culture fit” really mean? It’s often defined as recruiting people who, in theory, should be able to join your team and mesh with employees quickly because of their behavior and belief systems. Ideally, they would quickly add value to your veterinary practice, too, without causing conflict. Hiring for culture fit also can be described as a way to look at a job candidate as a whole, not just as a list of his or her qualifications and experiences. The person would be chosen in part based upon personality traits and how those traits match up with those of current employees.

At a high level, this makes sense. After all, you’ll want, for example, honest team members who desire to contribute to a workplace that genuinely provides quality animal care. And so, if you interview someone who fits those parameters, that’s a plus.

Good Intentions Go Astray

The danger occurs when you take the culture fit concept too far, narrowing what you’re looking for in a new employee. Culture fit can, quite unintentionally, become a catchphrase that means you want to hire people who think like you do, who perform their job duties like you do and who otherwise are just like you.

Doing this can lead to:

  • Lack of diversity among team members.
  • A dearth of viewpoints, creating a “me too” culture that inhibits growth.
  • Overlooking potential employees who would have plenty to contribute.

A practice that rejects candidates who fail to fit into a precise, preconceived mold despite their qualifications and despite what they can contribute is putting its efforts into maintaining the status quo rather than hiring to expand the possibilities.

More Than Culture

Instead of focusing on finding the right culture fit, what can make more sense is adding to your practice culture in strategic ways to increase what you have to offer clients.

Let’s say your practice team tends to come to a consensus quickly, which you’ve perceived as a good thing. But if you look around the room, you might notice that everyone is from the same generation, perhaps older Gen Xers.

If you added, say, a millennial to the mix, what would happen? There might not be as much consensus anymore, but you might receive a wealth of information about new technology, and this can add a new level of service to the practice, streamline communication and much more. Diversity isn’t just generational. It can involve making the practice more gender equal or evolve the racial-ethnic demographic.

Creating a more diverse workforce can benefit you in numerous ways. But to make that happen, make sure that a desire for culture fit doesn’t turn into a demand for consensus.

Hiring for Value Fit

Making sure that new employees fit in well so that you can pursue goals together is important. But for a new perspective, aim for value matching instead of focusing on culture fit.

For example, if your practice strongly believes in providing empathetic service to clients and their pets, then recruit and hire people who can live out that value. When you hire for a value fit, you look for candidates who share the same sense of purpose that others do at the practice. You still allow for, and even embrace, diverse points of view on how to achieve the goals.

This might sound like splitting hairs, but when companies carefully analyze their culture and define what they value, and then create a hiring structure based on those factors — and ensure the process isn’t really a path to a lack of diversity — then how the process is phrased might be a matter of linguistics. Unfortunately, not enough companies take the time to do a deep dive into what they value, and even fewer then interview and hire based on the intelligence gleaned. Too often, culture fit still means that those in charge of hiring make subjective decisions based on gut feelings about job candidates.

How can you tell the difference between hiring for culture and hiring for values? In the November/December 2018 issue of HR Magazine, a good example was given. Saying you want to hire friendly people who have a good attitude is an example of hiring for culture fit in a way that can hinder innovation. If, though, your practice places significant value on high autonomy in the workplace and you’ve discovered how to interview and hire for it, this can become a value fit hiring process.

The HR Magazine article also recommends that scorecards be used for candidate assessment. The example used is that a practice decides that relationship-building skills are valued. Without using a carefully created scorecard, a quieter candidate who has stellar relationship-building abilities can be overlooked. 

Job Candidate Preferences

What can be helpful is to talk to job candidates about the environments that allow them to thrive. Some people, for example, work especially well within a significant structure while others prefer to have wiggle room and space to breathe. Open-ended questions can give you additional insight into these candidates. If you feel uncomfortable about an answer, decide whether the answer is “wrong” for your practice or whether it’s an opportunity to open yourself to new ideas that would add value to the workplace.

If you end up hiring someone and it doesn’t work out well, you have an excellent chance to decipher why if failed. Did the employee’s values not mesh with yours? If so, do your interview notes reveal any missed red flags? What can you learn from the review?

When the notion of hiring for culture fit was first developed, it was a significant step in the right direction, focusing hiring managers on looking beyond mere lines on a resume. Including a cultural-fit component in your hiring practices can still be useful if your recruiting structure is well thought out, you’re strongly focused on values and you acknowledgement the importance of diversity.